Filmography

National Parks of Canada

5 films

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  • Documentary / Climbing Journal

    The game is up

    The game is up

    William J. Oliver (1934)

    Sound version of the silent picture 'Climbing Mount Tupper.' William J. Oliver filmed the ascent of Mount Tupper in the Glacier National Park by the famous Swiss mountain guide Edward Feuz accompanied by his daughter and another man. The party of three climb roped up to a height of 7000 feet.From there, the two men continue without the women to face the final part of the climb, 'a naked shaft of rock rising sheer and high'. The two men finally reach the summit and later, on the descent, they meet the woman, who is waiting for them. The film was produced by the National Parks of Canada to promote tourism travel to the Canadian Rockies.

    Canada / 11 min

    The game is up

    William J. Oliver

    • 1934
    • Canada
    • 11 min
    Sound version of the silent picture 'Climbing Mount Tupper.' William J. Oliver filmed the ascent of Mount Tupper in the Glacier National Park by the famous Swiss mountain guide Edward Feuz accompanied by his daughter and another man. The party of three climb roped up to a height of 7000 feet.From there, the two men continue without the women to face the final part of the climb, 'a naked shaft of rock rising sheer and high'. The two men finally reach the summit and later, on the descent, they meet the woman, who is waiting for them. The film was produced by the National Parks of Canada to promote tourism travel to the Canadian Rockies.

    Climbing locations

  • Documentary / Climbing Journal

    She climbs to conquer

    She climbs to conquer

    William J. Oliver (1932)

    Georgia Engelhard, accompanied by the Swiss mountain guide Ernest Feuz, stages a thrilling climb of Mount Victoria. Engelhard climbed Mount Victoria eight times in 1931 when she was 26. One of this trips was for filming the movie by the Canadian Pacific Railway cameraman Bill Olivier. During the filming, she and the crew were caught on South Peak in a horrific thunderstorm. 'The thunder was deadening and boomed back and forth from the rock walls, the lightning struck the rocks causing them to sing and spit flame. Our nailed boots and ice azes also spit fire, our hair stood on end.' The film was produced by the National Parks of Canada to promote tourism travel to the Canadian Rockies.

    Canada / 10 min

    She climbs to conquer

    William J. Oliver

    • 1932
    • Canada
    • 10 min
    Georgia Engelhard, accompanied by the Swiss mountain guide Ernest Feuz, stages a thrilling climb of Mount Victoria. Engelhard climbed Mount Victoria eight times in 1931 when she was 26. One of this trips was for filming the movie by the Canadian Pacific Railway cameraman Bill Olivier. During the filming, she and the crew were caught on South Peak in a horrific thunderstorm. 'The thunder was deadening and boomed back and forth from the rock walls, the lightning struck the rocks causing them to sing and spit flame. Our nailed boots and ice azes also spit fire, our hair stood on end.' The film was produced by the National Parks of Canada to promote tourism travel to the Canadian Rockies.

    Climbing locations

  • Documentary / Climbing Journal

    New skyscrapers for old

    William J. Oliver (1931)

    Mountain climbing with all its thrills near Lake O'Hara in Yoho National Park, British Columbia. The film begins on a busy street in Toronto with cars and a Yonge Street streetcar contending with traffic, and pedestrians during rush hour. It then cuts to a mountain in the Rockies and Lake O'Hara and with four men with pack-sacks boarding train. They later climb past the Seven Sisters waterfalls. Coming to an alpine lake, they begin the ascent to the summit, using ropes and picks and traversing some tricky rock faces. Near the top they reach the 'Devil's Window' and, finally, the summit. The film was produced by the National Parks of Canada to promote tourism travel to the Canadian Rockies.

    Canada / 10 min

    New skyscrapers for old

    William J. Oliver

    • 1931
    • Canada
    • 10 min
    Mountain climbing with all its thrills near Lake O'Hara in Yoho National Park, British Columbia. The film begins on a busy street in Toronto with cars and a Yonge Street streetcar contending with traffic, and pedestrians during rush hour. It then cuts to a mountain in the Rockies and Lake O'Hara and with four men with pack-sacks boarding train. They later climb past the Seven Sisters waterfalls. Coming to an alpine lake, they begin the ascent to the summit, using ropes and picks and traversing some tricky rock faces. Near the top they reach the 'Devil's Window' and, finally, the summit. The film was produced by the National Parks of Canada to promote tourism travel to the Canadian Rockies.

    Climbing locations

    Availability

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  • Documentary / Climbing Journal

    In the shadow of Assiniboine

    William J. Oliver (1920s)

    A climbing expedition by a mountain guide and a woman to the summit of Mount Wedgwood, on a training climb in preparation for an attempt to scale Mont Assiniboine. The two left their tents in the camp in the morning and after a walking approach they start climbing the rocky slopes roped together. Then they cross a snow field anf finally reach the summit after a crossing a dangerous rocky step. The film was produced by the National Parks of Canada to promote tourism travel to the Canadian Rockies.

    Canada / 10 min

    In the shadow of Assiniboine

    William J. Oliver

    • 1920s
    • Canada
    • 10 min
    A climbing expedition by a mountain guide and a woman to the summit of Mount Wedgwood, on a training climb in preparation for an attempt to scale Mont Assiniboine. The two left their tents in the camp in the morning and after a walking approach they start climbing the rocky slopes roped together. Then they cross a snow field anf finally reach the summit after a crossing a dangerous rocky step. The film was produced by the National Parks of Canada to promote tourism travel to the Canadian Rockies.

    Climbing locations

    Availability

    Watch Free
  • Documentary / Climbing Journal

    Climbing Mount Tupper

    William J. Oliver (1920s)

    William J. Oliver filmed the ascent of Mount Tupper in the Glacier National Park by the famous Swiss mountain guide Edward Feuz accompanied by his daughter and another man. The party of three climb roped up to a height of 7000 feet.From there, the two men continue without the women to face the final part of the climb, 'a naked shaft of rock rising sheer and high'. The two men finally reach the summit and later, on the descent, they meet the woman, who was still waiting for them. The film was sonorized and re-released in 1934 under the title of 'The game is up'. The film was produced by the National Parks of Canada to promote tourism travel to the Canadian Rockies.

    Canada / 11 min

    Climbing Mount Tupper

    William J. Oliver

    • 1920s
    • Canada
    • 11 min
    William J. Oliver filmed the ascent of Mount Tupper in the Glacier National Park by the famous Swiss mountain guide Edward Feuz accompanied by his daughter and another man. The party of three climb roped up to a height of 7000 feet.From there, the two men continue without the women to face the final part of the climb, 'a naked shaft of rock rising sheer and high'. The two men finally reach the summit and later, on the descent, they meet the woman, who was still waiting for them. The film was sonorized and re-released in 1934 under the title of 'The game is up'. The film was produced by the National Parks of Canada to promote tourism travel to the Canadian Rockies.

    Climbing locations

    Availability

    Watch Free

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